Uncover tips on how to deal with your vegetation in response to their signs


132


Caring for a green plant is not always easy. Indeed, it is a living organism in its own right with its own needs that are not always very easy to identify. As a result, it is not uncommon for gardeners to make mistakes in the maintenance of indoor plants and outdoor plants. Fortunately, between the moment we “adopt” them and the moment they die, our plants send us a whole host of signals which, if we know how to interpret them correctly, can allow us to save them from a disastrous fate. Too much water, lack of light, unsuitable fertilization… Learn to read the language of flowers, shrubs and other plants thanks to this memo that is more than welcome for any amateur or experienced gardener.

These tips will be as useful for houseplants and window boxes as for planting in the garden or vegetable patch.

1) When it comes to a lack of light

Signs to look out for:

-The growth of the plant and its flowering are very slow, even non-existent.
– New shoots fail.
-The new leaves are smaller and paler than the old ones which are starting to turn yellow.
-The stems are getting longer and thinner.

Attack plan :

If you notice these symptoms of etiolation, expose your plant to more light as soon as the first signs are identified. A slightly cooler temperature in the room (by about 3°C) and less frequent watering and fertilizing should allow your plant to fully recover.

2) Symptoms of too much light in plants

Signs to look out for:

-The foliage becomes pale, its green is less vivid
-The leaves are also covered with brown and dry spots, especially those most exposed to sun exposure.

Attack plan :

Move the plant away from its light source or install a translucent curtain to better protect it from direct exposure. If necessary, remove the most damaged leaves.

orchid rebloom brightness
Credits: Flickr/Maja Dumat (Blumenbiene)

3) Signs of a lack of water sent by plants

Signs to look out for:

-The foliage is soft and grows very slowly.
-In addition, the edges of the leaves begin to turn yellow and they may begin to fall off.
-Whether the surface of the soil appears wet OR pale, dry and hard, a deep look reveals that the soil is very dry.

Attack plan :

When a plant is thirsty, it must of course be watered, but not just anyhow! Indeed, a simple surface watering may not be enough and may not be properly absorbed. The correct technique is to immerse the pot in a tub of water and take it out when air bubbles form. Then let the pot drain quietly. The next times, do a normal watering.

4) Identify excess water or poor drainage

Signs to look out for:

-The leaves are soft and the oldest have brown spots at their tips.
– Both new and old leaves can also turn yellow and fall off.
-In addition, the roots become spongy and turn brown. They may even start to rot.
-Finally, the plant evolves very slowly.

Attack plan :

Empty the saucers after each watering to eliminate standing water and add newspaper to absorb excess moisture. You can then change it as needed. Also, wait for the soil to dry out before the next watering. You can also generally space out the waterings, because your plant is close to drowning, which may eventually completely asphyxiate it.

The added trick: if possible, add clay pebbles or cherry pits to the bottom of the pot when repotting.

watering plant watering watering can
Credits: iStock

5) Diagnose heatstroke in your plants

Signs to look out for:

– Stems lengthen and thin
-Older stems may also begin to wilt and fall off.
-As for the leaves, they begin to turn brown and fall.

Attack plan :

If you cannot lower the temperature of the room (for example by lowering the heating a little in winter), at least move your plant away from the offending heat source, whether it is the Sun, a radiator or a fireplace. In addition, eliminate the leaves that are too damaged to avoid the development of a disease.

6) Diagnosis of a cold snap in the plant

Signs to look out for:

After a sharp change in temperature, the foliage turns yellow and falls off or becomes covered with white spots.

Attack plan :

Indoor plants generally do not tolerate temperatures below 10°C. Also, even if they are protected indoors, this may not be enough to prevent them from getting cold. Choose the installation room well and watch them carefully when you change their place. If they move from indoors to outdoors or vice versa depending on the season, keep an eye on them and protect them from the elements as much as possible.




Like it? Share with your friends!

132